Why Plasma?

Why Plasma?

Rare diseases need extraordinary medicine

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Your plasma donation helps create 24 of them and is needed now more than ever.

Why donate plasma? Therapies made from plasma do so much for so many. Plasma derived  medicines treat those with immunodeficiencies, neurological disorders, shock, burns, and more. It’s used in operating rooms around the country for transplant patients, surgical patients, and cancer patients. Plasma saves lives, and by donating at CSL Plasma, you can help tens of thousands of people across the globe.

Why Donate at CSL Plasma?

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High quality standards


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Enhanced safety and cleaning procedures

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Rewarding and rewarding

*Varies by location and is subject to change

Meet Some of Our Patients

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Before receiving a therapy made from plasma, I had a fear of leaving the house because that could mean possibly getting sick and even ending up in the hospital.

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When hearing from my friends that have just donated, it warms my heart and makes me so happy. When you’re donating plasma, you are saving lives.

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My passion is to spread as much awareness about immune deficiency disorders and importance of plasma donation.

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Think about the life-changing difference you are making for someone. Plasma donation is an amazing act of love and kindness.

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Medicine made from plasma has given me the ability to spend time with family and friends, volunteer in my community, work, learn and go to school.

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Plasma-based treatment gives my immune system a fighting chance against all kinds of bacteria and viruses, most of which barely affect people with normal immune systems.

Did you know?

Plasma is a yellow-gold component of blood that transports nutrients and antibodies throughout your body.

Plasma FAQs

Blood is made up of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, all of which are suspended in plasma. Plasma is a clear-yellow liquid that suspends blood cells and helps transport antibodies, nutrients and waste through the body. Plasma is the cell free part of blood composed of water, proteins, electrolytes, lipids (fat) and carbohydrates. It makes up the majority of our blood and is approximately 92% water. Some of the proteins like albumin, gamma globulin, and anti-hemophilic factor (a protein that helps blood clot) are important for medical therapies.

Plasma is an important element that performs a variety of functions. The biggest task of plasma is to serve as a transport system for our bodies. It carries proteins, nutrients, hormones, waste products and drugs and other elements throughout our bodies and is also critical to maintaining the fluidity of blood. Not only does plasma help clot blood when there has been a cut, but it also works to fight disease as well as carry electrolytes to our muscles. Plasma even helps our bodies maintain the correct pH balance — avoiding too much or too little acidity — which is important for all of our cells to function. Plasma is also important because cells put their waste into the plasma. The plasma then moves that waste through the body to get rid of it.

Plasma is important to donate because it is a valuable part of treatment for a variety of health problems. The proteins, antibodies, clotting factors, and other nutrients in plasma make it useful in treating those suffering from trauma, shock, burns, and other emergencies. Plasma is used to treat rare and inherited chronic conditions, such as immune deficiencies, autoimmune disorders and hemophilia (the inability of blood to clot), among others. Often the therapies replace important proteins the patient lacks.

Plasma is in our bodies at birth and is replenished from the protein, water and salts we consume through our diets. They are absorbed through our digestive tracts. Fluids, proteins and other substances in the cells in our body can pass into the plasma to be transported to other parts of the body and maintain the essential fluidity and volume of plasma in our blood vessels.

When you donate plasma, it takes your body about 48 hours to replenish the volume you donated. When you rehydrate after you donate, you help speed up the process.  

In the healthcare community, plasma is sometimes considered “Liquid Gold” for all of the benefits it provides.

Blood is made up of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, all of which are suspended in plasma. Plasma is a clear-yellow liquid that suspends blood cells and helps transport antibodies, nutrients and waste through the body. Plasma is the cell free part of blood composed of water, proteins, electrolytes, lipids (fat) and carbohydrates. It makes up the majority of our blood and is approximately 92% water. Some of the proteins like albumin, gamma globulin, and anti-hemophilic factor (a protein that helps blood clot) are important for medical therapies.

Plasma is an important element that performs a variety of functions. The biggest task of plasma is to serve as a transport system for our bodies. It carries proteins, nutrients, hormones, waste products and drugs and other elements throughout our bodies and is also critical to maintaining the fluidity of blood. Not only does plasma help clot blood when there has been a cut, but it also works to fight disease as well as carry electrolytes to our muscles. Plasma even helps our bodies maintain the correct pH balance — avoiding too much or too little acidity — which is important for all of our cells to function. Plasma is also important because cells put their waste into the plasma. The plasma then moves that waste through the body to get rid of it.

Plasma is important to donate because it is a valuable part of treatment for a variety of health problems. The proteins, antibodies, clotting factors, and other nutrients in plasma make it useful in treating those suffering from trauma, shock, burns, and other emergencies. Plasma is used to treat rare and inherited chronic conditions, such as immune deficiencies, autoimmune disorders and hemophilia (the inability of blood to clot), among others. Often the therapies replace important proteins the patient lacks.

Plasma is in our bodies at birth and is replenished from the protein, water and salts we consume through our diets. They are absorbed through our digestive tracts. Fluids, proteins and other substances in the cells in our body can pass into the plasma to be transported to other parts of the body and maintain the essential fluidity and volume of plasma in our blood vessels.

When you donate plasma, it takes your body about 48 hours to replenish the volume you donated. When you rehydrate after you donate, you help speed up the process.  

In the healthcare community, plasma is sometimes considered “Liquid Gold” for all of the benefits it provides.